10 Interesting Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill

Those who love to read history might consider one of these following facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill really worth to read. The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775, mostly on and around Breed’s Hill, during the Siege of Boston early in the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after the adjacent Bunker Hill, which was peripherally involved in the battle and was the original objective of both colonial and British troops, and is occasionally referred to as the “Battle of Breed’s Hill”. For further information, to get you to know more about this battle, here are some other facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill you might like.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 1: Besieging

On June 13, 1775, the leaders of the colonial forces besieging Boston learned that the British generals were planning to send troops out from the city to occupy the unoccupied hills surrounding the city. In response to this intelligence, 1,200 colonial troops under the command of William Prescott stealthily occupied Bunker Hill and Breed’s Hill, constructed an earthen redoubt on Breed’s Hill.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 2: Pyrrhic Victory

While the result was a victory for the British, they suffered heavy losses: over 800 wounded and 226 killed, including a notably large number of officers. The battle is seen as an example of a Pyrrhic victory, because the immediate gain (the capture of Bunker Hill) was modest and did not significantly change the state of the siege, while the cost (the loss of nearly a third of the deployed forces) was high.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill - Battle of Bunker Hill

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill – Battle of Bunker Hill

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 3: British Planning

Throughout May, in response to orders from Gage requesting support, the British received reinforcements, until they reached a strength of about 6,000 men. On May 25, three generals arrived on HMS Cerberus: William Howe, John Burgoyne and Henry Clinton. Gage began planning with them to break out of the city,finalizing a plan on June 12.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 4: British Preparation

When the British generals met to discuss their options, General Clinton, who had urged an attack as early as possible, preferred an attack beginning from the Charlestown Neck that would cut off the colonists’ retreat, reducing the process of capturing the new redoubt to one of starving out its occupants.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill - Attack on Bunker Hill

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill – Attack on Bunker Hill

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 5: Colonist Reinforcing

Prescott, seeing the British preparations, called for reinforcements. Among the reinforcements were Joseph Warren, the popular young leader of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety, and Seth Pomeroy, an aging Massachusetts militia leader. Both of these men held commissions of rank, but chose to serve as infantry. For further information about any other battle related to the American Revolution, you better check out Facts about the Battle of Antietam.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 6:

By 3 pm, the British reinforcements, which included the 47th Foot and the 1st Marines, had arrived, and the British were ready to march. The smoke billowing from Charlestown lent an almost surreal backdrop to the fighting, as the winds were such that the smoke was kept from the field of battle.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill - Bunker Hill Monument

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill – Bunker Hill Monument

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 7: Retreat

The retreat of much of the colonial forces from the peninsula was made possible in part by the controlled retreat of the forces along the rail fence, led by John Stark and Thomas Knowlton, which prevented the encirclement of the hill. Their disciplined retreat, described by Burgoyne as “no flight; it was even covered with bravery and military skill”, was so effective that most of the wounded were saved;[55] most of the prisoners taken by the British were mortally wounded.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 8: Aftermath

The British had taken the ground but at a great loss; they had suffered 1,054 casualties (226 dead and 828 wounded), with a disproportionate number of these officers. The casualty count was the highest suffered by the British in any single encounter during the entire war.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill - Painting

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill – Painting

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 9: Political Consequences

When news of the battle spread through the colonies, it was reported as a colonial loss, as the ground had been taken by the enemy, and significant casualties were incurred. George Washington, who was on his way to Boston as the new commander of the Continental Army, received news of the battle while in New York City.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill 10: Notable Participants

A significant number of notable people fought in this battle. Henry Dearborn and William Eustis, for example, went on to distinguished military and political careers; both served in Congress, the Cabinet, and in diplomatic posts. Others, like John Brooks, Henry Burbeck, Christian Febiger, Thomas Knowlton, and John Stark, became well known for later actions in the war.

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill - Ralph Farnham

Facts about the Battle of Bunker Hill – Ralph Farnham

Hope you would find those Battle of Bunker Hill facts really interesting, useful and helpful for your additional reading.

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