10 Interesting Facts about the Battle of Midway

Those who love to read history might probably consider one of these following facts about the Battle of Midway really worth to read. The Battle of Midway was one of the most important naval battles of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy (USN) decisively defeated an attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy (UN) on Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. For further information, to get you to know more about this battle, here are some other facts about the Battle of Midway you might be interested in.

Facts about the Battle of Midway 1: Japanese Operation

The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped that another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific

Facts about the Battle of Midway 2: Japanese Plan

The Japanese plan was to lure the United States aircraft carriers into a trap.The Japanese also intended to occupy Midway as part of an overall plan to extend their defensive perimeter in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself.

Facts about the Battle of Midway - Battle of Midway

Facts about the Battle of Midway – Battle of Midway

Facts about the Battle of Midway 3: Background

Japan had attained its initial strategic goals quickly, taking the Philippines, Malaya, Singapore and the Dutch East Indies; the latter, with its vital oil resources, was particularly important to Japan. Because of this, preliminary planning for a second phase of operations commenced as early as January 1942.

Facts about the Battle of Midway 4: Operation MI

Typical of Japanese naval planning during World War II, Yamamoto’s battle plan was exceedingly complex,requiring the careful and timely coordination of multiple battle groups over hundreds of miles of open sea. Additionally, his design was predicated on optimistic intelligence suggesting that USS Enterprise and USS Hornet, forming Task Force 16, were the only carriers available to the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Facts about the Battle of Midway - Japanese survivors

Facts about the Battle of Midway – Japanese survivors

Facts about the Battle of Midway 5: Aleutian Invasion

The Japanese operations in the Aleutian Islands (Operation AL) removed yet more ships that could otherwise have augmented the force striking Midway. Whereas many earlier historical accounts considered the Aleutians operation as a feint to draw American forces away, early twenty-first century research suggested that AL was supposed to be launched simultaneously with the attack on Midway.

Facts about the Battle of Midway 6: Japanese Shortcomings

During the Battle of the Coral Sea one month earlier, the Japanese light carrier Shoho had been sunk and the fleet carrier Shokaku had sustained three bomb hits, and was in drydock undergoing repairs. Although the carrier Zuikaku escaped the battle undamaged, she had lost almost half her air group, and was in port in Kure awaiting replacement planes and pilots. For information about the other battles around these years, you might want to check out facts about the Battle of Britain.

Facts about the Battle of Midway - Midway Atoll

Facts about the Battle of Midway – Midway Atoll

Facts about the Battle of Midway 7: Attack on Japanese Fleet

The Americans had already launched their carrier aircraft against the Japanese. Admiral Fletcher, in overall command aboard Yorktown, and benefiting from PBY sighting reports from the early morning, ordered Spruance to launch against the Japanese as soon as was practical, while initially holding Yorktown in reserve in case any other Japanese carriers were found.

Facts about the Battle of Midway 8: Japanese Counterattack

Hiry?, the sole surviving Japanese aircraft carrier, wasted little time in counterattacking. Hiry?’s first attack wave, consisting of 18 dive bombers and six fighter escorts, followed the retreating American aircraft and attacked the first carrier they encountered, Yorktown, hitting her with three bombs, which blew a hole in the deck, snuffed out her boilers, and destroyed several anti-aircraft turrets.

Facts about the Battle of Midway - Midway survivors

Facts about the Battle of Midway – Midway survivors

Facts about the Battle of Midway 9: American Counterattack

Late in the afternoon, a Yorktown scout aircraft located Hiryu, prompting Enterprise to launch a final strike of dive bombers (including 10 SBDs from Yorktown). Despite Hiryu being defended by a strong cover of more than a dozen Zero fighters, the attack by Enterprise was successful: four, possibly five bombs hit Hiryu, leaving her ablaze and unable to operate aircraft.

Facts about the Battle of Midway 10: Aftermath

After winning a clear victory, and as pursuit became too hazardous near Wake,American forces retired. Spruance once again withdrew to the east to refuel his destroyers and rendezvous with the carrier Saratoga, which was ferrying much-needed replacement aircraft. Fletcher transferred his flag to Saratoga and resumed command of the carrier force.

Facts about the Battle of Midway - Pearl Harbor

Facts about the Battle of Midway – Pearl Harbor

Hope you would find those Battle of Midway facts really interesting, useful, and helpful for your additional reading.

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