10 Interesting Facts about the Battle of Saratoga

One of these following facts about the Battle of Saratoga might probably give you much information about this battle. The Battle of Saratoga marked the climax of the Saratoga campaign giving a decisive victory to the Americans over the British in the American Revolutionary War. British General John Burgoyne led a large invation army up the Champlain Valley from Canada, hoping to meet a similar force marching northward from New York City; the southern force never arrived, and Burgoyne was surrounded by American forces in upstate New York. For further information about this battle, here are some other facts about the Battle of Saratoga you might be interested in.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 1: Burgoyne’s Surrender

Burgoyne fought two small battles to break out. They took place eighteen days apart on the same ground, 9 miles (14 km) south of Saratoga, New York. They both failed. Trapped by superior American forces, with no relief in sight, Burgoyne surrendered his entire army on October 17.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 2: Burgoyne’s Strategy

Burgoyne’s strategy to divide New England from the southern colonies had started well, but slowed due to logistical problems. He won a small tactical victory over General Horatio Gates and the Continental Army in the September 19 Battle of Freeman’s Farm at the cost of significant casualties.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga - Battle of Saratoga

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga – Battle of Saratoga

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 3: First Battle

The first battle, on September 19, began when Burgoyne moved some of his troops in an attempt to flank the entrenched American position on Bemis Heights. Benedict Arnold, anticipating the maneuver, placed significant forces in his way. While Burgoyne did gain control of Freeman’s Farm, it came at the cost of significant casualties.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 4: British Situation

In June 1777 British General John Burgoyne, known as “Gentleman Johnny” for his manners, moved south from the province of Quebec to gain control of the upper Hudson River valley. After his early capture of Fort Ticonderoga, his campaign had become bogged down in difficulties.Elements of the army had reached the upper Hudson as early as the end of July, but logistical and supply difficulties delayed the main army at Fort Edward.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga - Battlefield of Fisherman's Farm

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga – Battlefield of Fisherman’s Farm

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 5: American Situation

The Continental Army had been in a slow steady state of retreat ever since Burgoyne’s capture of Ticonderoga early in July. By mid-August the army, then under the command of Major General Philip Schuyler, was encamped south of Stillwater, New York. On August 19, Major General Horatio Gates assumed command from Schuyler, whose political fortunes had fallen over the loss of Ticonderoga and the ensuing retreat.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 6: Battle of Firherman’s Farm

Moving cautiously, since the departure of his Native American support had deprived him of reliable reports on the American position, Burgoyne advanced to the south after crossing the Hudson. On September 18 the vanguard of his army had reached a position just north of Saratoga from the American defensive line, and skirmishes occurred between American scouting parties and the leading elements of his army. Check out more facts about the Battle of Princeton.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga - Boot Monument

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga – Boot Monument

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 7: The Battle

Morgan’s men took very careful aim, and picked off virtually every single officer in the advance company, and then charged, unaware that they were headed directly for Burgoyne’s main army. While they succeeded in driving back the advance company, Fraser’s leading edge arrived just in time to attack Morgan’s left, scattering his men back into the woods.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 8: Interlude

Burgoyne’s council discussed whether to attack the next day, and a decision was reached to delay further action at least one day, to September 21. The army moved to consolidate the position closer to the American line while some men collected their dead. The attack on the 21st was called off when Burgoyne received a letter dated September 12 from Henry Clinton, who was commanding the British garrison in New York City.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga - General John Burgoyne

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga – General John Burgoyne

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 9: British Foray

While Burgoyne’s troop strength was nominally higher, he likely had only about 5,000 effective, battle-ready troops on October 7, as losses from the earlier battles in the campaign and desertions following the September 19 battle had reduced his forces.General Riedesel advised that the army retreat. Burgoyne decided to reconnoiter the American left flank to see if an attack was possible.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga 10: Aftermath

Burgoyne’s failed campaign, as may be seen by the titles of some of the books that cover it in detail, marked a major turning point in the war.After the battle, he withdrew his men 10-15 miles north, near present-day Schuylerville, New York. General Burgoyne returned to England and was never given another commanding position in the British Army.

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga - Horatio Gates

Facts about the Battle of Saratoga – Horatio Gates

Hope you would find those Battle of Saratoga facts really interesting, useful, and helpful for your additional reading.

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