10 Interesting Facts about the Battle of Trenton

One of these following facts about the Battle of Trenton should probably give you much information about what kind of battle this is. The Battle of Trenton took place on the morning of December 26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War, after General George Washington’s crossing of the Delaware River north of Trenton, New Jersey. The hazardous crossing in adverse weather made it possible for WashingtonThese following facts about to lead the main body of the Continental Army against Hessian soldiers garrisoned at Trenton. After a brief battle, nearly the entire Hessian force was captured, with negligible losses to the Americans. For further information, to get you to know more about the battle, here are some facts about the Battle of Trenton you might be interested in.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 1: Armies and Commanders

In the battle of Trenton, the American army was led by General George Washington and his army had nearly 2,400 soldiers commanded by Major Generals John Sullivan and Nathanael Greene. The Hessian army was led by Colonel Johann Rall. Three regiments of Hessian troops were stationed at Trenton with a total of around 1,400 troops. A small British unit called 16th Dragoons was also there at Trenton.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 2: Delaware River Crossing

After a humiliating defeat in New York by the hands of the British and their Hessian auxiliaries, the American army led by General Washington was forced to retreat across New Jersey as the army of British commander Lord Cornwallis was in close pursuit. Washington’s army got temporary safety when they crossed Delaware River to enter Pennsylvania.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton - Battle of Trenton

Facts about the Battle of Trenton – Battle of Trenton

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 3: The Defeat

Their morale after the defeat was very low and nearly ninety-percent of the troops, who fought the battle of Long Island, left the army and went back. Soldiers felt that they were fighting for a losing cause, and General Washington faced a tough task of holding up the troops for the battles ahead. The enlistment terms of most of the soldiers were about to expire at the end of the year.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 4: Other Background

At that time, three regiments of Hessian soldiers commanded by Colonel Rall were stationed at Trenton, a small town in New Jersey.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton - George Washington leading his army

Facts about the Battle of Trenton – George Washington leading his army

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 5: American Battle Preparations

Washington planned the attack on Trenton to revive the dying confidence in his troops with a victory over British. Washington chose to plan the battle in rough weather as the terms of most enlisted soldiers were to expire by the year’s end. Washington planned to attack the Hessian regiments stationed at Trenton from 3 directions simultaneously. You are able to check on other battle related to this battle by reading facts about the Battle of Long Island.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 6: Diversionary Attack

General Cadwalader was to launch a diversionary attack on the British garrison at Bordentown to block any reinforcements from the south. The main assault force comprised of 2,400 troops and was led by Sullivan and Greene. The army would cross the Delaware River near Trenton and would then split into two parts – one led by Greene and other by Sullivan.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton - Passage of the Delaware

Facts about the Battle of Trenton – Passage of the Delaware

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 7: Attack Plans

Greene would attack from the north and Sullivan from the south in a coordinated attack. Also, across the river, General James Ewing was placed at Trenton Ferry with 700 men to prevent Hessian soldiers from escaping. Washington planned also planned to carry out attack on Princeton and New Brunswick after a victory in Trenton.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 8: The Battle

Washington and his Continental Army planned to move on the Christmas night, but faced stormy weather on the way. By the time they reached the Delaware River, it started snowing and crossing the river became difficult. Due to bad weather, Cadwalader and Ewing were unable to join the attack. The tough weather took some toll on the soldiers, but Washington tried to keep up the morale of the troops by encouraging them throughout.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton - The capture of the Hessians

Facts about the Battle of Trenton – The capture of the Hessians

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 9: Hessian Wounded

The American army took total control of the battle. All three Hessian regiments were isolated and were not able to coordinate. American soldiers took cover in houses and from there, fired freely. During the battle, Colonel Rall was fatally wounded. The Hessian troops were completely surrounded and were forced to surrender. Hessians suffered significant losses with 22 dead, 83 wounded, and nearly 1,100 troops captured. Americans only suffered 2 dead and 5 wounded.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton 10: Aftermath

British General Howe was surprised by the ease with which Americans won against Hessian troops. With the increased confidence of the Americans, the colonial effort was enthused and the morale advantage of British army was neutralized.

Facts about the Battle of Trenton - Washington's crossing park

Facts about the Battle of Trenton – Washington’s crossing park

Hope you would find those Battle of Trenton facts really interesting, useful and helpful for your additional reading.

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